A LETTER FROM THE WRITER & DIRECTOR 

MOLLY BETH MOROSSA 
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Welcome to spring, bitches.
 

I am obsessed with Christmas. The spangle-tat, the tinsel, the music - it is without a doubt, my favourite time of year. So when The Grotteaux, Shotgun Carousel’s first ever Christmas show, and the biggest production I had written and directed to date, was cancelled on the eve of its first show, I was devastated.


The show was rearranged for the Spring, and I spent a while trying to make our beautiful Christmas show work in May. And then I realised I had to let go. And that letting go, starting again, and embracing the unknown is what this show was about. I am a cabaret artist, writer, director and also a carer for my incredible mum, Shealagh, who has been ill for a few years now. A dancer, actor, teacher, lover of ridiculous whimsy and all round powerhouse, she’s danced on stage at the Palladium, the Opera House, (to name a few venues), and she is, without a doubt, the reason I do what I do. This show is for her. It’s about seizing the day and living life to the brim.

 

Directing this show has been incredible: we have a company of world-class solo artists and our ethos puts collaboration, agency and individual well-being firmly at the forefront. Seeing the cast support each other, and especially seeing them watch each other’s work come to life has been an absolute privilege.


I first came on board the Shotgun Carousel team as a cast member in Divine Proportions in 2018. Today I am Shotgun’s Head of Cabaret, and writer / director of our largest public production yet. Pencils at the ready, we’re about to tick some boxes: s a working class, queer, afab, non-binary person with a chronic illness, I didn’t ever think I would be in the position I am now, and will be eternally grateful to Laura for creating space for me to thrive. I am immensely proud of what we have made together. The Grotteaux is a testament to queer, trans and non-binary excellence, and proof that we belong not just within our own communities, but in the mainstream of the arts industry.